Think your company is doing OK?

Think you don’t need a current resume?

Don’t be surprised by a change in your job status. It’s smart to watch the market all the time, even if you feel safe.  Sign up for search engines to send a weekly email with local jobs in your field. Keep in touch with people in your network and make new contacts.

If you don’t want to make a move, at least be prepared. It’s even smarter in the tight economy, because it takes much less change in the economy to tip a company the wrong way.

Here are three key tips:

1. Have a savings account. If that’s not possible, have a list of what you could sell quickly and easily if the worst happened.

2. Know your local resources. I’m not just talking about employers. Where are the church food banks? Clothing help for the kids for school clothes? Is there a pet food bank for dog food? Assess your needs and find the resources now. You won’t have weeks or months to search them out if you need them, and you don’t want those needs to interfere with a job search for you or your spouse.

3. Set up job searches online now. Try different services and find out which ones pull the most job in your field. Experiment. You can turn them off, or limit the updates once you find the best of the best. But, best of all, you won’t waste time going through all that when your next meal depends on finding a new employer. In the process, you may find the perfect job too.

Good luck.

Interview Tips for Older Workers

Today, I’m adding a couple of quick interview tips to help you get through that rough re-enty when you’ve been out of the job market.

Interview Tips

Older workers, who are going back to work, may not know that many interview questions that used to be routine are now illegal. This also applies to job applicants of any age. Don’t volunteer information about family, age, or health.

If those questions come up, it can be awkward because you know you probably won’t get the job if you tell the interviewer his questions are illegal. There are several ways to handle it. You may nicely respond that you prefer not to discuss information that’s unrelated to the job. If you are not comfortable doing that, use a friendly, positive tone and say, “I’m sure I won’t have any problem meeting your expectations”, or “I’m totally prepared to devote my time to my job.” Above all, don’t volunteer information on these topics.

Resume Distribution Services

Don’t blast resumes to hundreds of companies that may not have an opening for someone with your skills. I’m sure there may be a success story someplace from someone doing that, but there are a lot more failures. The automated screening systems accept specific types of documents and formats, along with information completed by the applicant or someone acting on their behalf. Any system or service offering to distribute your resume for a low cost is not investing the time to complete individual applications. They don’t even care whether your resume gets to the companies. This type of thing seems to be dead. Still, sometimes old scams resurface. Don’t fall for it.

Posting Your Resume Online

If you want to post your resume on Indeed or Monster, that’s fine. Just be sure you take care to be sure you set all the privacy controls. It’s dangerous to have too much personal information visible. It’s not only a safety risk, it’s a risk for identity theft. Proceed with caution or get help from someone who knows how to manage those postings.